THE BIGGEST THREAT TO YOUR HERD
IS ONE YOU CAN’T EVEN SEE

THE PROBLEM:

SUBCLINICAL HYPOCALCEMIA

This condition occurs in freshening cows with low blood calcium but with
no obvious clinical signs of hypocalcemia (known as milk fever).

CLINICAL VS.
SUBCLINICAL

Subclinical hypocalcemia occurs immediately after calving in approximately 50%1 of second-lactation or greater cows, even if on a balanced transition diet. During this transition period, it can be difficult for a cow to maintain calcium balance — predisposing her to fresh-cow diseases.

Boehringer Ingelheim
Boehringer Ingelheim
Boehringer Ingelheim

THE IMPACT:

LOW CALCIUM, HIGH RISK

Experienced by over half of all second and greater lactation cows, subclinical hypocalcemia has a substantial impact on your bottom line.

COMPLICATIONS OF HYPOCALCEMIA

While subclinical hypocalcemia is hard to identify, the possible complications are clearly visible.

RISK FACTORS

All cows are at risk of subclinical hypocalcemia. HOWEVER: In general, the risk of subclinical hypocalcemia increases as a cow ages. Other cows that would most benefit from calcium supplementation include:2,3

  • 1

    Cows with high body condition scores

    rf1
  • 2

    Cows with a high milk yield in their previous lactation

    rf2
  • 3

    Cows with a prior history of milk fever

    rf2
  • 4

    Fresh cows that go off feed after calving

    rf2
  • 5

    Cows with lameness

    rf2

THE SOLUTION:

BOVIKALC —
Vital for her. Easy for you.

Not just any calcium bolus will do. Look for BOVIKALC, the market leader that is Ez to use and features the right forms of calcium for optimum delivery.

WHAT KIND OF CALCIUM DOES BOVIKALC USE?

BOVIKALC uses two types of calcium: calcium chloride and calcium sulfate.

These calcium ingredients have been proven best in aiding cows back to optimum performing levels, while ingredients in other brands fall short.4 Don’t risk allowing subclinical hypocalcemia in your herd — trust BOVIKALC.

CALCIUM CHLORIDE

to provide rapid
absorption

CALCIUM SULFATE

to provide a sustained
release of calcium

ADMINISTRATION PROTOCOL

Work with your herd veterinarian and nutritionist to determine the best BOVIKALC administration protocol for your herd. It is recommended to administer at least two BOVIKALC boluses:

Immediately

after calving

cowhead
bolus

12-24 hours

timer
12-24 hours

post calving (additional as needed)

cowhead
bolus
 

Do not use BOVIKALC for cows lying down
or showing signs of milk fever.

 

“Its a very standard procedure...(BOVIKALC has) streamlined things and makes it a lot easier.”

from Chris Schuler, Wilmar, Minn., Dairy Producer

“Less stress on the cow, a lot easier for the (staff)”

from Travis Spears, Green Leaf, Wis. Dairy Producer

“We use (BOVIKALC) on every cow that has a tough calving, every Jersey on the farm gets at least two boluses and every Holstein, second calf on gets two boluses”

from Tony Kohls, Arlington, Minn.

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

Fill out the information below to learn more about BOVIKALC and the Herd Health Rebate Program.

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REFERENCES
  1. Oetzel GR. Monitoring and testing dairy herds for metabolic disease. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2004;20(3):651-674.
  2. Houe H, Ostergaard S, Thilsing-Hansen T, et al. Milk fever and subclinical hypocalcemia: An evaluation of parameters on incidence risk, diagnosis, risk factors and biological effects as input for a decision support system for disease control. Acta Vet Scand 2001;42(1):1-29.
  3. DeGaris PJ and Lean IJ. Milk fever in dairy cows: A review of pathophysiology and control principles. Vet J 2008;176(1):58-69.
  4. Goff JP. Treatment of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium balance disorders. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 1999;15(3):619-639.

Bovikalc is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. ©2018 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. BOV-1464-BOV0718